“One of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s favorite books….”

September 30, 2014 at 6:17 pm (books, Short stories, True crime)

Crimes1and2

So says Harold Schechter, editor of True Crime: An American Anthology. Schechter informs us of this startling fact concerning Hawthorne’s reading preference in the course of his introduction to the essay “Jesse Strang.” Strang, it seems, murdered one John Whipple, husband of his lover Elsie Whipple. Jesse was besotted with Elsie, and she made use of that fact to goad him into eliminating her inconvenient and unwanted spouse. It’s a scenario redolent of associations with Ruth Snyder and Judd Gray,  though it predates that sensational case by many decades.

Nathaniel Hawthorne himself is represented in the Schechter anthology by a brief excerpt from his notebooks in which he describes a display of wax figures representing a variety of notorious murderers and their victims.

Nathaniel Hawthorne, true crime buff! As my grandmother (of blessed memory) would’ve said, “Who knew?”

In his fiction, Hawthorne returns time and again to the theme of sin, its corrosive and irreversible affect on the  human spirit, and the often vain hope of redemption. This preoccupation is usually said to have its roots in his ancestry – actually in one ancestor in particular. John Hathorne was one of the examining magistrates in the Salem witch trails of 1692. Unlike other judges who also took part, Hathorne was not known ever to express remorse over the role he played in those notorious proceedings.

I love the stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne, in part because they capture the mixture of unease and longing that dwelt in the hearts of the early settlers. Among my favorites are “Young Goodman Brown,” “The Birthmark,” and “The Gray Champion.” I especially love “Rappaccini’s Daughter” for its strange inversion of good and evil, and “The Minister’s Black Veil’ for its aura of  impenetrable mystery. Nothing is explained; the reader is left to wonder and speculate.

As a youth, Hawthorne was an introvert. He almost never went out into society. Having graduated from Bowdoin College in 1825, he declined to take up a profession. Instead,  he returned to his mother’s house in Salem to live in solitude and to write. His mother, being of a similar temperament,  left him to it.

After he had passed some years in this manner, Hawthorne became restless. On a visit to the Peabody family, ostensibly to see Elizabeth Peabody, he encountered her sister Sophia. They fell in love, and she and Hawthorne were married in 1842.

Nathaniel_HawthornebyCharles Osgood  Sophia_Peabody_Hawthorne

The full story of this late blooming love is an appealing one, especially as told in Miriam Levine’s lambent prose:

On a visit to the Peabody family in Salem, [Hawthorne] met Sophia Peabody. They had much in common. Both felt shadowy, unnreal, cut off from affection and vital life. Sophia, who, like Hawthorne, was born in Salem, had lived as a recluse since she was nine. sensitive, prone to excruciating headaches, she was dosed with drugs and encouraged in her invalidism as if it would be her lifes’ work. She told Hawthorne that she had lived in a seclusion as deep as his own.

Their marriage brought the Hawthornes into vivid immediate contact with the physical world. They felt alive, newly created by love. The world was real. They could feel it. They called themselves the new Adam and Eve. Everything they wrote during their stay at the Old Manse – in letters and diaries – conveys the pleasure of well-matched lovers who luckily, and against all odds, find sex delightful from the beginning. Sophia rejoiced that she was completely his. Her headaches stopped.

from A Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England

***********************************

It has been my privilege and pleasure to visit Concord, Massachusetts on several occasions. Each time I go, I am moved by the rich literary and historical sites and associations encountered there. Visiting the Old Manse, where the Hawthornes spent the first three years of their married life, is  a special experience.

The Old Manse, Concord, Massachusetts

The Old Manse, Concord, Massachusetts

I always seek out the window pane which bears the inscriptions made by Hawthorne and Sophia. (They used Sophia’s diamond ring as their writing tool.):

Man’s accidents are God’s purposes.
Sophia A. Hawthorne, 1843.

Nath’l Hawthorne.
This is his study.
1843

The smallest twig
leans clear against the sky.

Composed by my wife,
and written with her dia-
mond.

Inscribed by my
husband at sunset,
April 3, 1843
On the gold light. S. A. H.

How one longs to touch the words! But they are protected by an additional pane of glass (or at least, they were when I was last there.)

ManseWin Glass Etching at the Old Manse 2-M

Should you find yourself in this lovely town one day, I highly recommend Jane Langton’s delightful mystery, God in Concord. 11674. (Thanks to the Mysterious Press, novels in Langton’s series featuring Homer and Mary Kelly are now available on Kindle.)

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