True Crime: in the beginning…

April 2, 2015 at 5:23 pm (books, History, Mystery fiction, True crime)

truecrimea This anthology is arranged chronologically. It begins, quite literally, at the beginning, with an excerpt from William Bradford’s History of Plymouth Plantation (1651):

“This year John Billington the elder (one that came over with the first) was arraigned; and both by grand, and petty jury found guilty of willful murder; by plain and notorious evidence. And was for the same accordingly executed. This as it was the first execution amongst them, so was it a matter of great sadness unto them; they used all due means about his trial, and took the advice of Mr. Winthrop, and other the ablest gentlemen in the Bay of Massachusetts, that were then newly come over, who concurred with them that he ought to die, and the land be purged from blood. He and some of his, had been often punished for miscarriages before, being one of the profanest families amongst them; … His fact was, that he waylaid a young man, one John Newcomen (about a former quarrel) and shot him with a gun, whereof he died.”

Such poignancy in the line, “This as it was the first execution amongst them, so was it a matter of great sadness unto them…”

Statue of William Bradford in Plymouth, Mass.

Statue of William Bradford in Plymouth, Mass.

For more about John Billington, click here.
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The murder of John Newcomen took place in 1630. Another murder in the colonies, not included in the Schechter anthology, occurred in New Hampshire in 1648. In May or June of that year, one Hannah Willix was found floating in the Piscataqua River in New Hampshire. The body was in shocking condition: “…her necke broken, her tounge black and swollen out of her mouth & the bloud settled in her face, the privy partes swolne &c as if she had been muche abused &c.” In the course of her research, blogger Pam Carter, a lifelong Maine resident and self-confessed genealogy addict, discovered that Hannah Willix was her own tenth great grandmother.

Robert Begiebing, now professor of English emeritus at Southern New Hampshire University, first came across  this story in a different context: he was looking for fresh subject matter with which to engage creatively.

While in this rather restless frame of mind, Begiebing was reading “Bell’s History of Exeter,” an 1888 book about the Exeter-Newfields region where he lives. Alarms went off in Begiebing’s head when he came across a one-sentence entry in the journal of Massachusetts Bay Colony Gov. John Winthrop.

That sentence was exactly the same as the one, quoted above, that was found by Pam Carter in the course of her genealogical research. It fired Begiebing’s imagination at once; the result was a fine piece of historical crime fiction, in which Hannah Willix becomes the eponymous – and similarly unfortunate –  Mistress Coffin:46470

Here is the book trailer for this novel:

 

 

 

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