AAUW Readers Planning Session: instructive, stimulating – and fun!

May 17, 2016 at 4:01 pm (Book clubs, Book review, books)

Last Thursday’s AAUW Readers planning session was most enjoyable and productive. Here are some of the highlights:

 Fool_cover  As she was not able to come, Susan suggested via email that we read Richard Russo’s EVERYBODY’S FOOL. This is the “rollicking sequel” (as per The Seattle Times) to NOBODY’S FOOL from 1993. The latter was made into a film starring Paul Newman, of blessed memory. MV5BMjM1MTA0Mjc4Ml5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDUxNjcxMTE@._V1_UY1200_CR90,0,630,1200_AL_  (While I’ve read neither of  these titles, I do have a fond recollection of Russo’s EMPIRE FALLS.) Additionally recommended by Jean was Russo’s STRAIGHT MAN, a novel that sounds made to order for those of us who have labored, at some point in our working lives, in the groves of academe.

Richard Russo

Richard Russo

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BookReviewWildeLake-05b96  Barb brought WILDE LAKE by Laura Lippman.  Columbia, a planned community in Maryland where most of us live and some of us work, is composed of ten villages, of which Wilde Lake (est. 1967) was one of the first (possibly THE first?).  Laura Lippman graduated from Wilde Lake High School in 1977. Her novels are usually set in Baltimore, but this time, she’s brought the action back home to Howard County.

It’s safe to say that many readers in this area are eager to get their hands on this book. As of this writing, the local library has 360 reserves on it. (I’m number 165.)

Laura Lippman

Laura Lippman

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978034552868  Phyllis recommended THE SWANS OF FIFTH AVENUE by Melanie Benjamin. At this suggestion, several of us chimed in enthusiastically. The Literary Ladies – another book group to which I belong – had a terrific discussion of this title last month. Click here for a brief review and some striking photographs of a bygone era.

My recommendations were as follows:

THE INVENTION OF NATURE: ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT’S NEW WORLD, by Andrea Wulf: An amazing book about a great scientist and a true visionary. Essential reading for anyone who cares about the environment, science, botany, conservation – anything related to the natural world. Beautifully written and fascinating from beginning to end. (I’m gushing, I know, but I can’t help it.)

 

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DEEP SOUTH: FOUR SEASONS ON THE BACK ROADS, by Paul Theroux. After a lifetime of fruitful laboring in the vineyard of literature, Theroux may now have written his masterpiece. Sick of dealing with airplanes and airports, he got in his car and drove to points south – deep south, primarily Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas. His goal was to see how the people in these places were faring. What he found was poignant, heartbreaking, and at times inspiring.

For me, reading DEEP SOUTH was both an exalting and a humbling experience. How could I have been so oblivious to the pain and the vitality inherent these lives, in this vast swath of the country which is theirs as much as it is mine? He made me want to go there.

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51r0ee5foBL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_  THE NATURE OF THE BEAST by Louise Penny. Penny’s Three Pines mysteries don’t always work for me. The denizens of this strangely obscure village seem overly precious at times, except for the nasty poet Ruth and her pet duck, who veer in quite the opposite direction. In this particular series outing, all of these characters and more get  tangled up in a truly Byzantine plot. Nevertheless, it’s an absorbing read, and it’s based on a highly unusual, not to say bizarre, true story. (Gentle hint to this author: Could you possibly make more sparing use of the expletive “G-d damn?” Maybe it jumped out at me repeatedly the way it did because I was listening to the audiobook.)

what-was-mine-9781476732350_hr  the-light-between-oceans-9781451681758_hr  Sharon recommended WHAT WAS MINE by Helen Klein Ross.  Its disturbing premise intrigued us greatly. THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS by M.L. Stedman won praise from several of those present.

9781400067695  MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON by Elizabeth Strout was suggested by Rosemarie, who also mentioned THE MORNING THEY CAME FOR US: DISPATCHES FROM SYRIA by Janine di Giovanni. LUCY BARTON looks good – not least because it’s blessedly short – but I have to admit that Strout’s OLIVE KITTERIDGE, beloved by book clubs and awards committees, left me cold. Rarely have I encountered  a drearier, more humorless cast of characters! (On the other hand the film, with Frances McDormand in the title role, was a real tour de force.)

Doris noted how worthwhile it can be to reread classics that one had first encountered years earlier. She provided an excellent example in THE AWAKENING by Kate Chopin.  kate.chopin

In addition to THE NATURE OF THE BEAST and WILDE LAKE, two other crime and suspense novels were mentioned at our meeting. 20613611   in-a-dark-dark-wood-9781501112317_hr  Dottie suggested MALICE by the Japanese crime writer Keigo Higashino. (The Usual Suspects discussed THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X by this same author as part of our “international mystery” year in 2015. Most of us were favorably impressed by it.) And Jean brought IN A DARK, DARK WOOD, by Ruth Ware, a novel designated “a slick debut thriller” by NPR reviewer Jean Zimmerman.

Rita and Lorraine both had warm praise for A DICTIONARY OF MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING by Jackie Copleton.  51bZRSpSwoL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
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Additional recommendations were as follows:

FIRST WOMEN: THE GRACE AND POWER OF AMERICA’S MODERN FIRST LADIES, by Kate Andersen Brower
WHAT YOUR BODY SAYS (AND HOW TO MASTER THE MESSAGE), by Sharon Sayler
DEGREES OF EQUALITY: THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN AND THE CHALLENGE OF TWENTIETH CENTURY  FEMINISM by Susan Levine

THE SIGNATURE OF ALL THINGS by Elizabeth Gilbert

AHAB’S WIFE: OR, THE STAR-GAZER by Sena Jeter Naslund

WHAT JEFFERSON READ, IKE WATCHED AND OBAMA TWEETED: TWO HUNDRED YEARS OF POPULAR CULTURE IN THE WHITE HOUSE by Tevi Troy

MAESTRA by L.S. Hilton.

JEFFERSON’S SONS: A FOUNDING FATHER’S SECRET CHILDREN by Kimberly Bradley

THE CHILDREN’S CRUSADE by Ann Packer
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So there we were, faced with the challenge of narrowing the list down. We needed to decide on five titles for the coming year. (We meet every other month.) Lorraine’s suggestion that we put it to a vote worked extremely well. Those present could vote for multiple titles, if they so desired. We decided on the following:

THE SWANS OF FIFTH AVENUE
JEFFERSON’S SONS
DEEP SOUTH
FIRST WOMEN
WILDE LAKE

I think everyone present felt that we’d generated some terrific ideas for worthwhile reading, whether for group discussion or for individual enjoyment.

I feel lucky to be a part of this articulate and passionate group of fellow book lovers. Thanks to all of you!

 

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