Adventures in Art History, Part One: ‘Seductive Paris’

November 7, 2016 at 10:40 pm (Art, Local interest (Baltimore-Washington), Smithsonian Associates World Art History Certificate Program)

View of Ornans, Gustave Courbet

View of Ornans, Gustave Courbet

In which your intrepid faithful blogger and Jean, her equally intrepid friend and fellow art lover, commence their journey toward a Certification in World Art History, to be bestowed by the Smithsonian Associates, the educational arm of Washington’s illustrious Smithsonian Institution.

Alas, the day did not start out well. Our train, scheduled to leave at 7:59 AM, did not arrive until almost 9:30. Coincidentally, this was the exact time that our class – our very first one in the program – was scheduled to begin. As the train finally appeared in the distance, I could not help exclaiming, “Oh look! There comes a  chugging giant, traveling on these tracks at which we’ve been staring in frustration for an hour and a half! I believe it is a…Can it be..Yes!”

marc_train_at_odenton_2

The MARC train at the Odenton stop, where we caught it – finally

And so it went…

We arrived, panting but barely an hour late, at the Ripley Center, an odd little edifice on the Smithsonian campus where the class was  being held. ripley-center  At least, it seemed little, until we journeyed down two floors and found ourselves in an unexpectedly vast underground space.

But this was no time to stand gaping! We made for the Lecture Hall and were directed to the balcony, where we settled ourselves, whipped out our notebooks, and as the lecturer held forth about Realism in art  history, started scribbling madly. (Everyone around us was doing the same.)

My immediate first thought: I love this!

The program was called Seductive Paris. Our lecturer was Bonita Billman, who teaches art history at Georgetown University’s School of Summer and Continuing Studies. Ms Billman was knowledgeable, discursive, and witty. She possessed a large fund of anecdotes which greatly enhanced her presentation, which consisted of four lectures. They were as follows: French Teachers and American Students; Summers in the Country: American Painters in Brittany and Normandy; Domestic Bliss: Painters of Genre Scenes; and Impressionism in America. All the while Ms Billman was sharing her expertise with us, one gorgeous slide after another appeared on the screen beside and above the podium where she stood. Some of the art work was known to me; most was not. I wrote at frantic speed (and in very low light), trying to get down the names of paintings and artists that I particularly wanted to remember.

There is simply no way I can reproduce here the vast content that constituted these  talks. It was akin to condensing an entire semester of art history into one day’s proceedings. So what follows is a partial recapitulation of what was covered in the morning.

When Jean and I got to the lecture, Ms Billman was discussing Gustav Courbet, an artist of out sized genius with an ego to match. This pleased me, as I recalled the stunning exhibit of his works that I’d seen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art eight years ago.

The Desperate Man (Self-Portrait) ca. 1845

The Desperate Man (Self-Portrait) ca. 1845

Ms Billman highlighted The Stone Breakers (1850), which was destroyed during World War Two:

the-stonebreakers

Courbet was in the vanguard of realist painters. These artists turned away from portraits of the aristocracy and royalty, and of historical and mythological subjects. Instead, they sought to depict people one might encounter in the ordinary course of  life, laborers and peasants being chief among these. Jean-Francois Millet was also in this group:

jean-francois_millet_-_gleaners_-_google_art_project_2

The Gleaners, 1857

jean-francois_millet_-_el_angelus_museo_de_orsay_1857-1859millet

The Angelus, ca 1859

Jea-Francois Millet Self-portrait ca 1841

Jean-Francois Millet Self-portrait ca 1841

Our lecturer spoke about the Barbizon School and the artists associated with it. These artists were drawn to natural surroundings, and to their depiction on canvas.The Forest of Fontainebleau was their chief inspiration:

Despite differing in age, technique, training, and lifestyle, the artists of the Barbizon School collectively embraced their native landscape, particularly the rich terrain of the Forest of Fontainebleau. They shared a recognition of landscape as an independent subject, a determination to exhibit such paintings at the conservative Salon, and a mutually reinforcing pleasure in nature.

From “The Barbizon School: French Painters of Nature,” by Dita Amory

 Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot Forest of Fountainrbleau 1830

Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot: Forest of Fontainebleau, 1830

Narcisse Virgilio Diaz Forest of Fontainebleau 1868

Narcisse Virgilio Diaz   Forest of Fontainebleau, 1868

This group of artists had its counterpart in what is sometimes referred to as the American Barbizon School.  Ms Billman emphasized three painters associated with this movement: William Morris Hunt, Winslow Homer, and Theodore Robinson.

For a time, William Morris Hunt and his brother Richard Morris Hunt shared an apartment in Paris, hard by the Ecole Des Beaux Arts. Writes David McCullough: “From the training and inspiration each of the brothers was to experience in the next several years in France would come great strides for each in his work.” (This quote comes from The Greater Journey: American in Paris, a book I highly recommend.)

Dinan, Brittany, by William Morris Hunt

Dinan, Brittany, by William Morris Hunt

Landscape, by William Morris Hunt

Landscape, by William Morris Hunt

***************************

Late in 1866, motivated probably by the chance to see two of his Civil War paintings at the Exposition Universelle, [Winslow] Homer had begun a ten-month sojourn in Paris and the French countryside. While there is little likelihood of influence from members of the French avant-garde, Homer shared their subject interests, their fascination with serial imagery, and their desire to incorporate into their works outdoor light, flat and simple forms (reinforced by their appreciation of Japanese design principles), and free brushwork.

From an essay on Winslow Homer by H. Barbara Weinberg, Department of American Paintings and Sculpture, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Weinberg opens this essay with the following statement: “Winslow Homer (1836–1910) is regarded by many as the greatest American painter of the nineteenth century.” It’s not hard to see why.

The Milkmaid 1878

The Milkmaid 1878

Artists sketching in the White Mountains

Artists sketching in the White Mountains

Photo Stduio Comments -there is no master transparency for this...find and check against it Timeline Update - went to see actual piece and color corrected based on the painting. Working Title/Artist: Snap the Whip Department: Am. Paintings / Sculpture Culture/Period/Location: HB/TOA Date Code: Working Date: 1872 photography by mma, DT1395.tif retouched by film and media (jnc) 9_3_09

Snap the Whip

The Four Leaf Clover

The Four Leaf Clover

Boys in a Pasture

Boys in a Pasture

****************************
Like William Morris Hunt, Theodore Robinson was born in Vermont. He traveled to Paris, Venice, and Bologna, returning to America in 1879. Five years later, he returned to France, where he became part of the artists’ colony that had  formed around Monet at his house and  garden in Giverny.

Robinson returned to America in 1892. He had intended to go back to France once again. Instead, in 1896, while in New York City, he succumbed to an acute asthma attack. He was 43 years old.

Le Cortège Nuptial (The Wedding Procession), 1891

Le Cortège Nuptial (The Wedding Procession), 1891

Nantucket 1882

Nantucket 1882

The Old Bridge 1890

The Old Bridge 1890

There’s more to come on ‘Seductive Paris.’

 

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