The D.A. Goes To Trial: another Doug Selby novel by Erle Stanley Gardner

April 16, 2017 at 1:16 am (Book review, books, Mystery fiction)

I continue to enjoy Erle Stanley Gardner’s Doug Selby novels. There are nine in total; The D.A. Goes To Trial, published in 1940, is the fourth in the series.

Unsurprisingly, this novel is quite plot driven. But there are also descriptive passages like the one with which the story commences:

Streaks of eastern color appeared behind the mountains separating the rich orchard land from the desert. The night had been cold, although not cold enough for smudging. A light layer of frost coated the lower levels where the railroad trestled its way across the dry, sandy wash.

Out on the mesa land could be heard the hoarse bark of tractors as ranchers, bundled against the cold, pulled plows across the fertile soil.

Gardner says a lot with a little, I think. (And how I love all things California, both past and present….)

At any rate, as I said, the Selby novels are primarily plot driven, this one especially so. I have to admit, I got lost around the far turn several times. But it didn’t matter; I was so enjoying the company I was in.

Reminders abounded of how times have changed between now and then. In one scene Sylvia Martin, who is accompanying Doug on a chartered flight to Arizona, makes the following suggestion: “Let’s switch out the lights while we have our cigarettes….”

In addition, there are the old fashioned dial telephones without so much as a voicemail service, the cigarettes rolled on the spot with papers and loose tobacco, and the hobos – defined by Wikipedia as  “a migratory worker or homeless vagabond, especially one who is impoverished.” –  Such individuals are still a presence on the landscape, even as the Depression gives way to the industrial boom brought on by the Second World War.

The publisher provides this handy come-on at the front of the book:

   Here you will find a battered body under a railroad trestle…a vanished bookkeeper…a wire from a man who wasn’t there…a girl who fought Doug because she couldn’t have him…a political game with Doug as the goat. And a set of fingerprints that simply had to be where they weren’t–and couldn’t be where they were!
Doug’s on his way again, with the able assistance of Sylvia Martin, the lovely young reporter with a nose for news and an eye for Doug.

Regrettably,  in the course of  this narrative, Gardner occasionally refers to Mexican laborers in derogatory terms. This kind of heedless denigration is something one encounters from time to time in crime fiction from the 1930s and 1940s. On the other hand, Sylvia Martin, “the lovely young reporter” alluded to above, is a woman whose brains are more than equal to her looks. She’s a welcome contrast to the female characters who frequently populate works in this genre, in the same period. These tend to be either poor broken flowers wholly dependent on a man – or several men – to fix their lives, or else they are dangerous sirens who use their sexual allure to tame and trap the men in their lives.

That said, there is another continuing female character in this series who treads a somewhat odd middle ground. Her name is Inez Stapleton; she’s connected to Doug via common experiences shared in years past. Read the books and try to figure out for yourself what her game is.

Here’s the complete list of  novels in this series::

Doug Selby, the district attorney in fictional Madison County, California:
The D.A. Calls It Murder (1937)

The D.A. Holds a Candle (1938)

The D.A. Draws a Circle (1939)

The D.A. Goes to Trial (1940)

The D.A. Cooks a Goose (1942)

The D.A. Calls a Turn (1944)

The D.A. Breaks a Seal (1946)

The D.A. Takes a Chance (1948)

The D.A. Breaks an Egg (1949)

(Thanks to StopYoureKillingMe.com for this information.)

I’ve recently discovered  that two of these books are currently in print courtesy of a small press called House of Stratus:

Why just these two? No idea. However, I’m grateful, anyway.

My copy of The D.A. Goes To Trial, obtained through interlibrary loan, is in a gray library binding. But I had fun looking on line for something more colorful. Here are several that I found:

 

And now: on to The D.A. Cooks a Goose!

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