Best Reading in 2017: Classic Crime

December 1, 2017 at 10:44 pm (Best of 2017, books, Mystery fiction)

Before I blast off for London town, here’s a shout-out for the year’s most rewarding reading experience; namely, my immersion in vintage and classic works of crime fiction, facilitated by this singularly excellent volume by Martin Edwards:

I’ve already written about several titles suggested therein, but here  are the are again, with new ones added to the mix.

These three were highly enjoyable:

  

  

These, even more so:

features a wonderfully atmospheric setting in the Scottish Highlands

Wonderful turn of the century setting on the continent, with a plot inspired by an actual crime

Click here for my review of this title.

If I had to choose my absolute favorites thus far, it would be these three:

Egyptian mysteries, terrific writing, a cunning plot, and a love story – The Eye of Osiris has all of these elements, and more.

Where Israel Rank is concerned, it’s a classic case of being amazed not to have heard of this book before now. Israel Rank is a young man on the make – and then some. His father is Jewish, and so he is set apart, to a certain degree, at the outset. The accusation of anti-Semitism is frequently made in regard to this novel. Certainly, as the narrative unfolds, the fact of Rank’s Jewish heritage is alluded to from time to time, by himself and by others. Certain unwarranted generalizations are made. I personally was made slightly uneasy at times, but I was never offended. My verdict: the author skates close to the territory, but never actually goes in.

Martin Edwards describes the novel as “edgy and provocative.” I agree with that assessment.

Israel Rank has been adapted both as a film and a Broadway show. The film is from 1949 and is entitled Kind Hearts and Coronets. In it, Alec Guinness  portrays no fewer than nine different characters! The name ‘Israel Rank’ is changed to ‘Louis Mazzini;’ accordingly, he became half Italian rather than half Jewish. I’ve not had a chance to see the film yet, but I hope to soon.   The Broadway musical is entitled A Gentleman’s Guide To Love and Murder. I’ve not seen that either, though my cousin Stephany, a Broadway aficionado par excellence, has seen it and declares it to be quite wonderful.

It’s one of the most recognized name in all of crime fiction. Yet I’d never read a single book by Ellery Queen before now.

What was I waiting for?

I loved Calamity Town. It has everything I look for in a mystery: ingenious plotting, believable and often sympathetic characters, excellent writing, a love story – or a hint of the possibility of one – it’s all here, in abundance. The novel is set in the small New England town of Wrightsville – there are, I believe, several others with the same setting.

The Ellery Queen novels were authored jointly by two men professionally known as Frederic Dannay and Manfred B.Lee.

Manfred B. Lee, left, and Frederic Dannay

Lee and Dannay were two cousins straight out of Brooklyn, that cauldron of American talent (or in a few cases, notoriety).    In addition to writing their own novels and short stories, they anthologized the work of other notable writers.  And of course there’s Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, launched by the Mercury Press in 1941 and still going strong today more than 70 years later. Frederic Dannay was editor-in-chief up until his death in 1982. According to Wikipedia, “It is now the longest-running mystery fiction magazine in existence.”

Michael Grost of A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection has a lengthy and detailed entry for Ellery Queen. In it, he states bluntly: “They are the most important American detective writers of the Twentieth Century.”

So thanks, Martin Edwards. It’s good to know that I have lots more reading pleasure awaiting me, courtesy of your splendidly curated list!

Martin Edwards

 

 

3 Comments

  1. Carol Herman said,

    Thanks for this list. Have a wonderful trip.

  2. Carol said,

    .Lots of great reading here.
    Didn’t know you were going. Have a super trip!
    !

  3. Rose Johnson said,

    Cheerio as you are off across the pond. Happy travels.

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