“We live in Paradise, don’t we?” – Falling in Love, by Donna Leon

May 5, 2015 at 12:55 pm (Book review, books, Italy, Music, Mystery fiction, opera)

51epssesh-L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_  When I first heard the title of the new Commissario Guido Brunetti novel, I thought it an odd one for a mystery. Now I’ve read the book, and I still think it odd.

That is not to say I didn’t enjoy it – I did. For me, Donna Leon almost never disappoints, and she didn’t this time. The saga of Flavia Petrelli, an opera singer bedeviled by an obsessed fan, was enriched as usual by the incomparable Venetian setting. Added to that, the opera in question is none other than Puccini’s Tosca.

I found myself almost pathetically eager to be once more in the company of the cultured Commissario. At the Questura, he deals skillfully  with difficult, often dense superiors and prickly administrative assistants – yes, that would chiefly be the mercurial Signorina Elettra. At home, he is buoyed by the companionship provided by Paola, his spirited and fiercely intellectual wife, and  his children Chiara and Raffi. (And these four really are present in one another’s lives. Not only are their dinners often festive affairs, but they also frequently lunch together – at home, enjoying delicious feasts prepared by Paola.)

In his book Opera as Drama (1956, revised 1988), Joseph Kerman famously referred to Tosca as “a shabby little shocker.” In a recent essay collection, Leon herself calls it “a vulgar potboiler I wouldn’t today cross the street to hear.” My response to all of this vilification is…YES!! Tosca is everything an opera should be: turbulent, melodramatic, filled with over the top exploding passions and glorious music, and – well, quintessentially operatic.

FallingInLove

Scarpia, dead on the floor, where he belongs, the lecherous swine!!

As usual, the city of Venice is itself a character in the drama. There are the inevitable laments over its deterioration and despoiling, particularly by the hoards of tourists who are bent on destroying what they supposedly love. And yet…As Brunetti and Paola are walking homeward on a moonlit night, they experience this:

There was no wind, so the moon was reflected as though on a plate of dark glass. No boats came for some minutes, and Brunetti remained silent, as if afraid that the sound of his voice would shatter the surface of the water and thus destroy the moon. The footsteps on the bridge stopped, and for a long time there was silence. A Number One appeared down at Vallaresso and crossed over to La Salute, breaking the spell and then the reflection. When Brunetti turned towards San Vidal, he saw motionless people on the steps below him, all transfixed by the now-shimmering moon and the silence and the facades on either side of the canal. He looked to his right and saw that the railing was lined with more motionless people, faces raised for the moon’s benediction.

Paola  is moved to exclaim: “We live in Paradise, don’t we?”

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Here’s my favorite video of Venice. The music is “Winter” from The Four Seasons, by  the Venetian composer Antonio Vivaldi. The violinist is Federico Agostini.

I’ve featured this segment in previous posts, but it’s always worth seeing and hearing again:

This is my favorite aria from Tosca – possibly my favorite aria in all of opera: ‘Recondita Armonia,‘ sung here by Marcelo Alvarez.

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